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Hunt Midwest educates KC brokers, links two development worlds

Hunt Midwest educates KC brokers, links two development worlds
Autumn MorningSky – MetroWire Media

For the last five years, it’s been impossible to discuss Kansas City’s development boom without mention of the powerhouse that is Hunt Midwest. The sister company of the Kansas City Chiefs has saturated local real estate news and has even graced a number of major national news outlets this year – from NPR to CNN – who are fascinated with the flourishing underground business world the company has created. Even outside of SubTropolis, Hunt Midwest has grown other segments of its business by leaps and bounds, including its surface industrial park, data center, senior housing projects and more.

But it’s been five years since the company brought in the local brokerage to educate them on the range of Hunt Midwest’s offerings. That changed last week when the company brought in more than 50 brokers and numerous officials from various economic development groups around Kansas City, including a slew of new faces Hunt Midwest CEO Ora Reynolds wanted to educate and get to know.

“Five years ago, we didn’t do as much vertical construction as we do now. We were known as someone who would sell a piece of ground that someone could build on, but now our focus is that we can provide all the options: We can sell you ground, we can sell you ground and build your facility for you, or we can do a build-to-suit and lease it for you. You’ve got a lot of different options to cover the full spectrum of users out there,” Reynolds said. “We also wanted them to understand the strategic niches we’re going after – automotive upfitters and suppliers, e-commerce, fulfillment companies, and government users and tech users – and talk about our strategy, which is the synergy between the underground and the surface.”

SubTropolis - Great Big Story

The Hidden Metropolis Beneath Kansas City

The Hidden Metropolis Beneath Kansas City
Great Big Story

One-hundred-fifty feet below Kansas City, in a 270-million-year-old limestone deposit, more than 1600 people work in the world’s largest business labyrinth. They basically work in the Batcave, and it’s probably more interesting than your office. As seen on CNN — Check out the video essay here.

Hunt Midwest is a full-service real estate development company with a focus on industrial, commercial, retail, mission critical, multifamily, senior living and residential real estate. The Hunt Midwest portfolio is anchored by SubTropolis, the world’s largest underground business complex.

Located in the heart of the Midwest, this Kansas City, Missouri-based company is developer of over 6,200 acres of commercial, retail, industrial and residential property, and owner/developer of SubTropolis, the world’s largest underground business complex.

SubTropolis is a subterranean, 1,150-acre industrial park in Kansas City, Missouri, with over 6 million square feet of leasable space. The complex is home to more than 55 local, national and international businesses with 1,600 employees. SubTropolis is an ENERGY STAR certified warehouse facility. Hunt Midwest’s headquarters is located within SubTropolis.

As seen in Bloomberg: Welcome to SubTropolis

As seen in Bloomberg Businessweek: Welcome to SubTropolis

Welcome to SubTropolis: The Massive Business Complex Buried Under Kansas City
More than 1,000 people spend their workdays in SubTropolis, an industrial park housed in an excavated mine the size of 140 football fields
By Patrick Clark, February 4, 2015 

About 10 percent of Kansas City’s commercial real estate is underground, says Ora Reynolds, president of SubTropolis landlord Hunt Midwest. Landlords have made a cottage industry out of underground industrial space, thanks to rock formations near the Missouri River that allow trucks to drive into the old mines instead of tenants needing to use elevators to get things in and out.

The underground industrial park known as SubTroplis opened for business in 1964 in an excavated mine below Kansas City, Mo., attracting tenants with the lure of lower energy costs and cheap rents. The walls, carved out of 270-million-year-old limestone deposits, help keep humidity low and temperatures at a constant 68 degrees, eliminating the need for air conditioning or heating. Tenants have reported saving as much as 70 percent on their energy bills, says Ora Reynolds, president of SubTropolis landlord Hunt Midwest. Rents run about $2.25 per square foot, about half the going rate on the surface. “It’s also a question of sustainability,” says Joe Paris, vice president at Paris Brothers, a specialty foods packager that employs about 200 workers underground. In addition to Paris Brothers, 51 tenants have rented nearly 6 million square feet of space. Others include LightEdge Solutions, a cloud computing company that uses the mild climate to help cool servers, and an underground archive that contains the original film reels to Gone with the Wind and Wizard of Oz.  Go to Bloomberg.com for more…